Why Did Chiang Kai-shek Lose China? The Guomindang Regime And The Victory Of The Chinese Communist Party

“Reports of lost battles swirl in like falling snow,” wrote Chiang Kai-shek at the end of 1948. “North China and the below-the-wall region are on the brink of collapse. I do not feel guilty. I tried my best” (quoted in: Jay Taylor,  The Generalissimo: Chiang Kai-shek and the Struggle for Modern China, 2009, p. 397). … Continue reading Why Did Chiang Kai-shek Lose China? The Guomindang Regime And The Victory Of The Chinese Communist Party

The Green Gang, Chiang Kai-shek, and the Republic of China

The Origins of the Green Gang The origins of the Green Gang can be traced back to the 15th century, when a spiritual leader named Luo Qing (羅清, pinyin: Luó Qīng) founded a Buddhist sect, the Patriarch Luo Sect. The sect evolved from the famous White Lotus, which had played a major role in the overthrow … Continue reading The Green Gang, Chiang Kai-shek, and the Republic of China

Hong Kong identity and Chinese nationalism – A clash of civilizations

In 2012 thousands of people took to the streets in Hong Kong to protest against a government proposal to introduce a new Chinese national education curriculum into Hong Kong schools. The curriculum, modelled after the so-called “patriotic education” taught in mainland China, would have included material that praised the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), described as … Continue reading Hong Kong identity and Chinese nationalism – A clash of civilizations

Taiwanese citizen detained in China for displaying Taiwanese flag

A Taiwanese citizen surnamed Yang (楊) was detained in China for publicly displaying the flag of Taiwan. According to Taiwan-based “Liberty Times”, on October 15 Mr. Yang visited the Sun Yat-sen Memorial in the Chinese city of Nanjing. After he took pictures holding the flag of the Republic of China (ROC), Mr. Yang was surrounded … Continue reading Taiwanese citizen detained in China for displaying Taiwanese flag

The Communist United Front in British Hong Kong – Governor Alexander Grantham’s Letter from 19 November 1957

Introduction On 25 January, 1841, the British survey ship Sulphur landed on Hong Kong, a small Chinese island with a population of merely 3,000 people, most of whom were fishers and stone-cutters. The largest settlement, located in present-day Stanley, had about 1,000 villagers. The following day, Tuesday, 26 January, Commodore Sir J. J. G. Bremmer, … Continue reading The Communist United Front in British Hong Kong – Governor Alexander Grantham’s Letter from 19 November 1957

China’s army deletes poem by ‘traitor’ Wang Jingwei

The Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has deleted from its official Weibo account a poem by Wang Jingwei, a revolutionary leader and politician who collaborated with the Japanese during World War II. According to media reports, on March 28 the PLA published a poem by Wang Jingwei on Weibo, China’s Twitter-like microblogging platform. The poem … Continue reading China’s army deletes poem by ‘traitor’ Wang Jingwei

Brainwashing the people – Mao Zedong, the Chinese Communist Party and the politics of thought control

On the evening of 17 May 1966 Deng Tuo, one of China‘s most prominent Communist propagandists, committed suicide by overdose of sleeping tablets as an act of protest against charges levelled against him during the Cultural Revolution. Following the tradition of Chinese political suicides, which dated back to the loyal minister Qu Yuan in the … Continue reading Brainwashing the people – Mao Zedong, the Chinese Communist Party and the politics of thought control

Professor Jin Yuelin’s confession and self-criticism during China’s 1951-52 thought reform campaign

On April 17, 1952, the newspaper Guangming Daily published a “confession” written by professor Jin Yuelin (金岳霖, also spelled Chin Yüeh-lin). The confession, entitled “Criticism of my idealistic bourgeois pedagogical ideology” (批判我的唯心論的資產階級教學思想), was made during the “thought reform campaign” launched by the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) under Mao Zedong‘s leadership in 1951-52 (Chen 1960, p. … Continue reading Professor Jin Yuelin’s confession and self-criticism during China’s 1951-52 thought reform campaign

Is democracy possible in China? Democratic thought in Chinese history – Sun Yat-sen, Lin Yutang, Carsun Chang

Since the founding of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) in 1949, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has dominated public discourse through its control of the media and education. The CCP has thus successfully promoted an image of China that suits its own interests. One of the key elements of CCP propaganda is its opposition … Continue reading Is democracy possible in China? Democratic thought in Chinese history – Sun Yat-sen, Lin Yutang, Carsun Chang