China and the May 4th Movement

"When the May Fourth Movement took place in 1919, I was only sixteen years old, a student at the Tianjin Women’s Normal College", wrote Deng Yingchao (邓颖超/ 鄧穎超; pinyin: Dèng Yǐngchāo) years after the events. "On May 4, 1919 students in Beijing held a demonstration asking the government to refuse to sign the Versailles Peace … Continue reading China and the May 4th Movement

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China-Taiwan Tensions and the Guomindang’s Existential Crisis

In November 2014 the Guomindang (Chinese Nationalist Party) suffered a defeat in Taiwan's local elections, winning 40.7% of the votes and only 6 out of 22 local seats. The main opposition party, the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), gained 47.5% of the votes. This setback led to the resignation en masse of the Guomindang executive cabinet. It … Continue reading China-Taiwan Tensions and the Guomindang’s Existential Crisis

China Ready to Use Military Force if Taiwan Declares Independence, says Chinese Admiral

"If the Democratic Progressive Party [Taiwan's ruling party] declares independence (台独), then we must go to war without hesitation," said Yin Zhuo, Rear Admiral of the Chinese Navy, in an interview on March 5. "If [they] declare independence, we will use military force to bring about unification, we must be very clear about that." In the interview, Yin … Continue reading China Ready to Use Military Force if Taiwan Declares Independence, says Chinese Admiral

The 228 Incident – The Uprising that Changed Taiwan’s History

228 Incident (The Terrible Inspection), circa 1947, by Li Jun At 11:00 A.M. of February 27, 1947, Taipei City's Monopoly Bureau was informed that a boat carrying fifty boxes of illegal matches and cigarettes had arrived near the port of Danshui, north of Taipei. Matches and cigarettes were part of the system of government monopolies … Continue reading The 228 Incident – The Uprising that Changed Taiwan’s History

Civilized Taiwanese vs Uncivilized Mainlanders: Peng Mingmin and Anti-Chinese Rhetoric

In recent years it has become common both in Taiwan and in Hong Kong to portray mainland Chinese as backward and uncivilized. Some controversial episodes that were covered by the media have shaped this perception. Only to name a few, in 2014 a mainland couple allowed their child to urinate on a street in Hong … Continue reading Civilized Taiwanese vs Uncivilized Mainlanders: Peng Mingmin and Anti-Chinese Rhetoric

The Origins of Taiwanese Identity

The current discussion about Taiwanese identity is very much influenced by the ideological and political battle between those who think that the Taiwanese people constitute a separate nation, and those who think that the Taiwanese are simply a subgroup of the larger Chinese nation. Between 1945 and the end of the 1980s, when Taiwanese national … Continue reading The Origins of Taiwanese Identity

The 1992 Consensus and China-Taiwan Relations

From 2008 to 2016 Taiwan's Guomindang administration and China's Communist Party sought to deepen cross-strait dialogue and improve relations between the two sides. The meeting between Zhang Zhijun, the chief of China's Taiwan Affairs Office (TAO), and Wang Yuqi, the chief of Taiwan's Mainland Affairs Council (MAC), as well as Zhang Zhijun's visit to Taiwan in 2014, … Continue reading The 1992 Consensus and China-Taiwan Relations

Chiang Kai-shek – Dictator, Idealist, Criminal?

Chiang Kai-shek, the leader of the Republic of China (ROC) and of the Guomindang from 1927 to 1975, is a controversial figure whose legacy is still debated both in China and in Taiwan. In this post we shall let Chiang himself speak and quote several passages from his speeches and works which highlight the complexity … Continue reading Chiang Kai-shek – Dictator, Idealist, Criminal?

Legalism And Leninism In China’s Constitutional History

When the Qing Dynasty was overthrown in 1911 and the Republic of China (ROC) was proclaimed, the revolutionaries led by Sun Yat-sen embarked on an ambitious experiment to modernise the country according to liberal Western ideals of democracy, human rights and division of powers. The new Republican government issued a Provisional Constitution which guaranteed progressive … Continue reading Legalism And Leninism In China’s Constitutional History

Legalist Tradition And Criminal Law – Republic Of China vs People’s Republic Of China

In a previous post we have demonstrated that the Constitution of the People's Republic of China (PRC) contains fundamental elements which are consistent with, if not directly derived from, Legalist principles. In this chapter we shall analyse and compare the Legalist elements contained in the criminal codes of the Republic of China (ROC) and of … Continue reading Legalist Tradition And Criminal Law – Republic Of China vs People’s Republic Of China