Confucianism And The Law In Singapore And Taiwan

In the previous posts we have shown how Legalist and Confucian values as well as the legal codes of imperial China have influenced the legal system of the People's Republic of China (PRC). We have concluded that the Communist state emphasizes Legalist principles and legal traditions that aimed at protecting dynastic rule from rebellion and treason. … Continue reading Confucianism And The Law In Singapore And Taiwan

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Law In Post-Mao China: Confucianism, Legalism, Imperial Traditions

In the previous post we have described the similarities and differences between Maoism and Legalism, and in particular we have shown the parallels between Maoist and Legalist doctrines regarding the establishment of an autocratic, centralised state. Moreover, we have demonstrated that Mao Zedong rejected Confucian values, which he viewed as "reactionary". In this post we … Continue reading Law In Post-Mao China: Confucianism, Legalism, Imperial Traditions

Mao Zedong, Legalism and Confucianism – Similarities And Differences

When Mao Zedong proclaimed the founding of the People's Republic of China (PRC) on October 1, 1949, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) stood before the tremendous task of rebuilding the state on the basis of Soviet-style Communist principles. Yet despite their desire to create a new China, Communist leaders drew on old political and social … Continue reading Mao Zedong, Legalism and Confucianism – Similarities And Differences

China’s Legal System And The “Ten Abominations”

Before the overthrow of the Qing Dynasty in 1911, China's legal system differed from that of liberal Western states in three major aspects: First, the apex of the entire legal system was the absolute monarch; it was the emperor who issued and abolished laws, and the most serious crimes of the legal code were those … Continue reading China’s Legal System And The “Ten Abominations”

Law In Imperial China – Confucianism And Legalism

The legal system of imperial China developed from two schools of thought: Confucianism and Legalism. Although both of them exerted a deep influence on China's state-building as well as on its moral and legal traditions, at the beginning these two philosophies were bitterly opposed to each other, as they were based on entirely different principles … Continue reading Law In Imperial China – Confucianism And Legalism

China’s Legal System – Communist or Feudal?

    On October 13, 2014, Yu Wensheng, a lawyer from Beijing, was arrested and detained by the police for 99 days . He was interrogated approximately 200 hundred times by 10 officers who worked in shifts night and day. Yu's wrists were fastened behind his back with handcuffs.  "My hands were swollen and I … Continue reading China’s Legal System – Communist or Feudal?

‘Pretty, Innocent Asian Girls’: The Cult of Cuteness in East Asian Societies

Different countries have different aesthetic standards: the shape of houses, streets and squares, the way people talk and dress, the landscape, orderliness, chaos etc. - these are all elements that make up each place's unique atmosphere.    Aesthetic traits such as fashion and manners belong to the visible characteristics that distinguish peoples in different parts … Continue reading ‘Pretty, Innocent Asian Girls’: The Cult of Cuteness in East Asian Societies

Memorial Arches, State, and Family Virtues in Imperial China

In imperial China the family was the nucleus of social order and state ideology. Unlike its Western counterpart, the Chinese family was not simply a social unit; it was an institution that over the centuries gave rise to an ideology that permeated the lives of every individual and shaped the structure of the state.    … Continue reading Memorial Arches, State, and Family Virtues in Imperial China

Propriety and Ritualism in Chinese Society

To many Westerners China seems a mysterious and unfathomable country, and the behaviour and mindset of her people almost impenetrable. One thing that appears to have been puzzling Western observers for decades is the question of moral values and interpersonal relationships in Chinese society.   Among East Asian nations, China is the one that conceals … Continue reading Propriety and Ritualism in Chinese Society

Filial Piety (孝) in Chinese Culture

In order to understand Chinese culture and society it is fundamental to understand the Chinese family. The family in China was not only a social unit, but it represented a whole codified ideology that pervaded the state and the society for thousands of years. Many of the differences between Chinese and Western thinking are comprehensible … Continue reading Filial Piety (孝) in Chinese Culture