The 1992 Consensus and China-Taiwan Relations

From 2008 to 2016 Taiwan's Guomindang administration and China's Communist Party sought to deepen cross-strait dialogue and improve relations between the two sides. The meeting between Zhang Zhijun, the chief of China's Taiwan Affairs Office (TAO), and Wang Yuqi, the chief of Taiwan's Mainland Affairs Council (MAC), as well as Zhang Zhijun's visit to Taiwan in 2014, … Continue reading The 1992 Consensus and China-Taiwan Relations

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Voluntary Surrender and Confession in China’s Legal System – From the Empire to the People’s Republic

China's Televised Confessions On January 17 Gui Minhai, a Chinese-born Swedish citizen, made a high-profile confession on China Central Television (CCTV), saying that he had turned himself to the authorities voluntarily. He confessed to having caused the death of a 20-year-old woman while drunk-driving back in 2003. According to China's state media, Gui had subsequently fled … Continue reading Voluntary Surrender and Confession in China’s Legal System – From the Empire to the People’s Republic

Chiang Kai-shek – Dictator, Idealist, Criminal?

Chiang Kai-shek, the leader of the Republic of China (ROC) and of the Guomindang from 1927 to 1975, is a controversial figure whose legacy is still debated both in China and in Taiwan. In this post we shall let Chiang himself speak and quote several passages from his speeches and works which highlight the complexity … Continue reading Chiang Kai-shek – Dictator, Idealist, Criminal?

Legalism And Leninism In China’s Constitutional History

When the Qing Dynasty was overthrown in 1911 and the Republic of China (ROC) was proclaimed, the revolutionaries led by Sun Yat-sen embarked on an ambitious experiment to modernise the country according to liberal Western ideals of democracy, human rights and division of powers. The new Republican government issued a Provisional Constitution which guaranteed progressive … Continue reading Legalism And Leninism In China’s Constitutional History

Legalist Tradition And Criminal Law – Republic Of China vs People’s Republic Of China

In a previous post we have demonstrated that the Constitution of the People's Republic of China (PRC) contains fundamental elements which are consistent with, if not directly derived from, Legalist principles. In this chapter we shall analyse and compare the Legalist elements contained in the criminal codes of the Republic of China (ROC) and of … Continue reading Legalist Tradition And Criminal Law – Republic Of China vs People’s Republic Of China

Sun Yat-sen: Memoirs of a Chinese Revolutionary

Sun Yat-sen (source: Wikipedia) Sun Yat-sen (1866 – 1925) was a Chinese revolutionary and politician. During the Late Qing era he fought to overthrow the Manchu Dynasty and establish a new, modern Chinese state. His political doctrines, most notably the Three Principles of the People, had a deep impact on the development of China in … Continue reading Sun Yat-sen: Memoirs of a Chinese Revolutionary

Confucianism And The Law In Singapore And Taiwan

In the previous posts we have shown how Legalist and Confucian values as well as the legal codes of imperial China have influenced the legal system of the People's Republic of China (PRC). We have concluded that the Communist state emphasizes Legalist principles and legal traditions that aimed at protecting dynastic rule from rebellion and treason. … Continue reading Confucianism And The Law In Singapore And Taiwan

The Guomindang, The Communist Party And Leninism

Founded in 1912, the Guomindang (中國國民黨, literally China National People's Party) is the oldest still active political party in the Chinese-speaking world. It constituted the first elected majority in the Chinese National Assembly of 1913. After Yuan Shikai's coup d'etat, the Guomindang devoted itself to the mission of reunifying China, defeating the warlords, and defending the country's territorial integrity … Continue reading The Guomindang, The Communist Party And Leninism

Provisional Constitution Of The Republic Of China (1931)

The following text is the Provisional Constitution (約法) of the Republic of China as adopted by the National People's Convention (國民會議) on May 12, 1931. The Provisional Constitution included Sun Yat-sen's principle of "political tutelage", de facto providing the Guomindang government with dictatorial powers. The Constitution remained in effect until 1936, when the government promulgated a new … Continue reading Provisional Constitution Of The Republic Of China (1931)

The Chinese Revolution of 1911 – The Founding of the Republic of China

The Chinese Revolution of 1911, also called Xinhai Revolution (辛亥革命) after the year of the Chinese calendar in which it occurred, was an uprising that led to the fall of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) and to the foundation of the Republic of China (中華民國, ROC). The revolt began on October 9th when the accidental explosion of … Continue reading The Chinese Revolution of 1911 – The Founding of the Republic of China